Facing the Realities of Mental Illness

“Whoever suffers mental illness always bears God’s image and likeness, and has an inalienable right to be considered a person and treated as such.” - St. John Paul II Mental health is a critical component of wellbeing.  As a society, we don’t have to look far to encounter those who struggle with mental illness. Statistically, 1 out of every 4 people will experience mental illness in their lifetime.   The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes October 10th as World Mental Health Day. It is an annual event that provides an opportunity “for all stakeholders working on mental health issues to talk about their work and what more needs to be done to make mental health care a reality for people worldwide,” according to the Mental Health Foundation. This year, the theme for World Mental Health Day is focused on young people and mental health in a changing world. Young people are more anxious and depressed than ever.  According to the WHO, half of all diagnosed mental illnesses begin at the age of 14, and many of the illnesses we experience are either left undetected or untreated. In terms of the burden of the disease among adolescents, depression is the third leading cause affecting their health, and suicide is the second leading cause of death among those ages between 15 and 29. As the rates for mental illness increase, we cannot neglect the grave problem that the stigma of mental illness presents, especially for young people.   So how can we even begin to take part in combating the stigma of mental illness?   Pope John Paul II gives us an important insight on how to take care of those suffering in a 2003 address on the theme of “depression”: “The role of those who care for depressed persons and who do not have a specifically therapeutic task consists above all in helping them to rediscover their self-esteem, confidence in their own abilities, interest in the future, the desire to live.  It is therefore important to stretch out a hand to the sick, to make them perceive the tenderness of God, to integrate them into a community of faith and life in which they can feel accepted, understood, supported, respected; in a word, in which they can love and be loved.”   Every human person has a need for family and relationships within society, and for many who struggle with mental illness, isolation and loneliness  are realities in their daily life. We are all asked to contribute our gifts and talents--through our own personal vocations--to reach those who are suffering in the ways which we are able, integrate them into a community and begin to combat the reality of mental illness. Find out how you can help combat mental illness by furthering your education with a master’s or doctoral degree in psychology or counseling. Request program information today!
About DMU
Divine Mercy University (DMU) is a Catholic graduate university of psychology and counseling programs. It was founded in 1999 as the Institute for the Psychological Sciences. The university offers a Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology, Master of Science (M.S.) in Counseling, Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology, and Certificate Programs.